Washington Schools Foundation

generating project ideas

The Foundation aims to generate a range of interesting ideas for proposals.  New models that do not fit neatly into existing categories are welcome. Following is an explanation of purposes served by different kinds of projects, coupled with a few examples, to stimulate thinking about possibilities.  For the 2012 Pilot Project, all grants will be three-weeks in duration.

 I. CURRICULUM AND STUDENT LIFE PROJECTS (Three-weeks)

 Individual, Departmental, Grade-Level, Cross Grade Level projects can be very useful vehicles to support program development or assessment in a particular discipline or to look at curriculum through a new lens.

 Cross-departmental projects can serve to address an aspect of learning which is central to multiple disciplines or that seeks to create interdisciplinary connections.

 School projects serve to focus attention on an important aspect of programming or understandings central to work with a particular age group.

 Cross-school projects, focused on a discipline, an aspect of teaching and learning, or a school-wide issue, have a particular role in linking faculty across divisions and addressing district priorities.

II. FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS (Three-week)

 Individual projects can provide a unique professional opportunity for immersion in one’s field through research, lab work, writing, artistic creation, etc.

 Group projects bring together faculty who have shared interests, often in a workshop setting.  Some of these projects are hybrids of a curricular and professional development. Others have curricular implications but their primary focus on professional growth of faculty.

III. ONE-WEEK PROJECTS (No One-Week Projects will be awarded in 2012)

 District-wide issues:  One week project grants can promote progress on central institutional or school issues by bringing together a broad group of faculty with varied perspectives for intensive discussion.

 Extension of prior grant project work:  One week project grants can be useful in extending or assessing work down previously in a four-week project.

 Preparatory work for a four-week project grant: A small group might do exploratory/preparatory work needed prior to a four-week project grant involving a large number of members.